Update copyright headers
[qt:qt.git] / doc / src / objectmodel / properties.qdoc
1 /****************************************************************************
2 **
3 ** Copyright (C) 2015 The Qt Company Ltd.
4 ** Contact: http://www.qt.io/licensing/
5 **
6 ** This file is part of the documentation of the Qt Toolkit.
7 **
8 ** $QT_BEGIN_LICENSE:FDL$
9 ** Commercial License Usage
10 ** Licensees holding valid commercial Qt licenses may use this file in
11 ** accordance with the commercial license agreement provided with the
12 ** Software or, alternatively, in accordance with the terms contained in
13 ** a written agreement between you and The Qt Company. For licensing terms
14 ** and conditions see http://www.qt.io/terms-conditions. For further
15 ** information use the contact form at http://www.qt.io/contact-us.
16 **
17 ** GNU Free Documentation License Usage
18 ** Alternatively, this file may be used under the terms of the GNU Free
19 ** Documentation License version 1.3 as published by the Free Software
20 ** Foundation and appearing in the file included in the packaging of
21 ** this file.  Please review the following information to ensure
22 ** the GNU Free Documentation License version 1.3 requirements
23 ** will be met: http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html.
24 ** $QT_END_LICENSE$
25 **
26 ****************************************************************************/
27
28 /*!
29     \page properties.html
30     \title The Property System
31     \brief An overview of Qt's property system.
32
33     \ingroup qt-basic-concepts
34     \target Qt's Property System
35
36     Qt provides a sophisticated property system similar to the ones
37     supplied by some compiler vendors. However, as a compiler- and
38     platform-independent library, Qt does not rely on non-standard
39     compiler features like \c __property or \c [property]. The Qt
40     solution works with \e any standard C++ compiler on every platform
41     Qt supports. It is based on the \l {Meta-Object System} that also
42     provides inter-object communication via \l{signals and slots}.
43
44     \section1 Requirements for Declaring Properties
45
46     To declare a property, use the \l {Q_PROPERTY()} {Q_PROPERTY()}
47     macro in a class that inherits QObject.
48
49     \snippet doc/src/snippets/code/doc_src_properties.cpp 0
50
51     Here are some typical examples of property declarations taken from
52     class QWidget.
53
54     \snippet doc/src/snippets/code/doc_src_properties.cpp 1
55
56     A property behaves like a class data member, but it has additional
57     features accessible through the \l {Meta-Object System}.
58
59     \list 
60
61     \o A \c READ accessor function is required. It is for reading the
62     property value. Ideally, a const function is used for this purpose,
63     and it must return either the property's type or a pointer or
64     reference to that type. e.g., QWidget::focus is a read-only property
65     with \c READ function, QWidget::hasFocus().
66
67     \o A \c WRITE accessor function is optional. It is for setting the
68     property value. It must return void and must take exactly one
69     argument, either of the property's type or a pointer or reference
70     to that type. e.g., QWidget::enabled has the \c WRITE function
71     QWidget::setEnabled().  Read-only properties do not need \c WRITE
72     functions. e.g., QWidget::focus has no \c WRITE function.
73
74     \o A \c RESET function is optional. It is for setting the property
75     back to its context specific default value. e.g., QWidget::cursor
76     has the typical \c READ and \c WRITE functions, QWidget::cursor()
77     and QWidget::setCursor(), and it also has a \c RESET function,
78     QWidget::unsetCursor(), since no call to QWidget::setCursor() can
79     mean \e {reset to the context specific cursor}. The \c RESET
80     function must return void and take no parameters.
81
82     \o A \c NOTIFY signal is optional. If defined, it should specify one
83     existing signal in that class that is emitted whenever the value
84     of the property changes.
85
86     \o A \c REVISION number is optional. If included, it defines the
87     the property and its notifier signal to be used in a particular
88     revision of the API that is exposed to QML.
89
90     \o The \c DESIGNABLE attribute indicates whether the property
91     should be visible in the property editor of GUI design tool (e.g.,
92     \l {Qt Designer}). Most properties are \c DESIGNABLE (default
93     true). Instead of true or false, you can specify a boolean
94     member function.
95
96     \o The \c SCRIPTABLE attribute indicates whether this property
97     should be accessible by a scripting engine (default true).
98     Instead of true or false, you can specify a boolean member
99     function.
100
101     \o The \c STORED attribute indicates whether the property should
102     be thought of as existing on its own or as depending on other
103     values. It also indicates whether the property value must be saved
104     when storing the object's state. Most properties are \c STORED
105     (default true), but e.g., QWidget::minimumWidth() has \c STORED
106     false, because its value is just taken from the width component
107     of property QWidget::minimumSize(), which is a QSize.
108
109     \o The \c USER attribute indicates whether the property is
110     designated as the user-facing or user-editable property for the
111     class. Normally, there is only one \c USER property per class
112     (default false). e.g., QAbstractButton::checked is the user
113     editable property for (checkable) buttons. Note that QItemDelegate
114     gets and sets a widget's \c USER property.
115
116     \o The presence of the \c CONSTANT attibute indicates that the property 
117     value is constant.  For a given object instance, the READ method of a 
118     constant property must return the same value every time it is called.  This
119     constant value may be different for different instances of the object.  A
120     constant property cannot have a WRITE method or a NOTIFY signal.
121
122     \o The presence of the \c FINAL attribute indicates that the property
123     will not be overridden by a derived class.  This can be used for performance
124     optimizations in some cases, but is not enforced by moc.  Care must be taken
125     never to override a \c FINAL property.
126
127     \endlist
128
129     The \c READ, \c WRITE, and \c RESET functions can be inherited.
130     They can also be virtual. When they are inherited in classes where
131     multiple inheritance is used, they must come from the first
132     inherited class.
133
134     The property type can be any type supported by QVariant, or it can
135     be a user-defined type. In this example, class QDate is considered
136     to be a user-defined type.
137
138     \snippet doc/src/snippets/code/doc_src_properties.cpp 2
139
140     Because QDate is user-defined, you must include the \c{<QDate>}
141     header file with the property declaration.
142
143     For QMap, QList, and QValueList properties, the property value is
144     a QVariant whose value is the entire list or map.  Note that the
145     Q_PROPERTY string cannot contain commas, because commas separate
146     macro arguments. Therefore, you must use \c QMap as the property
147     type instead of \c QMap<QString,QVariant>. For consistency, also
148     use \c QList and \c QValueList instead of \c QList<QVariant> and
149     \c QValueList<QVariant>.
150
151     \section1 Reading and Writing Properties with the Meta-Object System
152
153     A property can be read and written using the generic functions
154     QObject::property() and QObject::setProperty(), without knowing
155     anything about the owning class except the property's name.  In
156     the code snippet below, the call to QAbstractButton::setDown() and
157     the call to QObject::setProperty() both set property "down".
158
159     \snippet doc/src/snippets/code/doc_src_properties.cpp 3
160
161     Accessing a property through its \c WRITE accessor is the better
162     of the two, because it is faster and gives better diagnostics at
163     compile time, but setting the property this way requires that you
164     know about the class at compile time. Accessing properties by name
165     lets you access classes you don't know about at compile time. You
166     can \e discover a class's properties at run time by querying its
167     QObject, QMetaObject, and \l {QMetaProperty} {QMetaProperties}.
168
169     \snippet doc/src/snippets/code/doc_src_properties.cpp 4
170
171     In the above snippet, QMetaObject::property() is used to get \l
172     {QMetaProperty} {metadata} about each property defined in some
173     unknown class. The property name is fetched from the metadata and
174     passed to QObject::property() to get the \l {QVariant} {value} of
175     the property in the current \l {QObject}{object}.
176
177     \section1 A Simple Example
178
179     Suppose we have a class MyClass, which is derived from QObject and
180     which uses the Q_OBJECT macro in its private section. We want to
181     declare a property in MyClass to keep track of a priorty
182     value. The name of the property will be \e priority, and its type
183     will be an enumeration type named \e Priority, which is defined in
184     MyClass.
185
186     We declare the property with the Q_PROPERTY() macro in the private
187     section of the class. The required \c READ function is named \c
188     priority, and we include a \c WRITE function named \c setPriority.
189     The enumeration type must be registered with the \l {Meta-Object
190     System} using the Q_ENUMS() macro. Registering an enumeration type
191     makes the enumerator names available for use in calls to
192     QObject::setProperty(). We must also provide our own declarations
193     for the \c READ and \c WRITE functions. The declaration of MyClass
194     then might look like this:
195
196     \snippet doc/src/snippets/code/doc_src_properties.cpp 5
197
198     The \c READ function is const and returns the property type. The
199     \c WRITE function returns void and has exactly one parameter of
200     the property type. The meta-object compiler enforces these
201     requirements.
202
203     Given a pointer to an instance of MyClass or a pointer to a
204     QObject that is an instance of MyClass, we have two ways to set
205     its priority property:
206
207     \snippet doc/src/snippets/code/doc_src_properties.cpp 6
208
209     In the example, the enumeration type that is the property type is
210     declared in MyClass and registered with the \l{Meta-Object System}
211     using the Q_ENUMS() macro. This makes the enumeration values
212     available as strings for use as in the call to setProperty(). Had
213     the enumeration type been declared in another class, its fully
214     qualified name (i.e., OtherClass::Priority) would be required, and
215     that other class would also have to inherit QObject and register
216     the enumeration type there using the Q_ENUMS() macro.
217
218     A similar macro, Q_FLAGS(), is also available. Like Q_ENUMS(), it
219     registers an enumeration type, but it marks the type as being a
220     set of \e flags, i.e. values that can be OR'd together. An I/O
221     class might have enumeration values \c Read and \c Write and then
222     QObject::setProperty() could accept \c{Read | Write}. Q_FLAGS()
223     should be used to register this enumeration type.
224
225     \section1 Dynamic Properties
226
227     QObject::setProperty() can also be used to add \e new properties
228     to an instance of a class at runtime. When it is called with a
229     name and a value, if a property with the given name exists in the
230     QObject, and if the given value is compatible with the property's
231     type, the value is stored in the property, and true is returned.
232     If the value is \e not compatible with the property's type, the
233     property is \e not changed, and false is returned. But if the
234     property with the given name doesn't exist in the QObject (i.e.,
235     if it wasn't declared with Q_PROPERTY(), a new property with the
236     given name and value is automatically added to the QObject, but
237     false is still returned. This means that a return of false can't
238     be used to determine whether a particular property was actually
239     set, unless you know in advance that the property already exists
240     in the QObject.
241
242     Note that \e dynamic properties are added on a per instance basis,
243     i.e., they are added to QObject, not QMetaObject. A property can
244     be removed from an instance by passing the property name and an
245     invalid QVariant value to QObject::setProperty(). The default
246     constructor for QVariant constructs an invalid QVariant.
247
248     Dynamic properties can be queried with QObject::property(), just
249     like properties declared at compile time with Q_PROPERTY().
250
251     \sa {Meta-Object System}, {Signals and Slots}
252
253     \section1 Properties and Custom Types
254
255     Custom types used by properties need to be registered using the
256     Q_DECLARE_METATYPE() macro so that their values can be stored in
257     QVariant objects. This makes them suitable for use with both
258     static properties declared using the Q_PROPERTY() macro in class
259     definitions and dynamic properties created at run-time. 
260
261     \sa Q_DECLARE_METATYPE(), QMetaType, QVariant
262
263     \section1 Adding Additional Information to a Class
264
265     Connected to the property system is an additional macro,
266     Q_CLASSINFO(), that can be used to attach additional
267     \e{name}--\e{value} pairs to a class's meta-object, for example:
268
269     \snippet doc/src/snippets/code/doc_src_properties.cpp 7
270
271     Like other meta-data, class information is accessible at run-time
272     through the meta-object; see QMetaObject::classInfo() for details.
273 */