Update copyright headers
[qt:qt.git] / doc / src / howtos / unix-signal-handlers.qdoc
1 /****************************************************************************
2 **
3 ** Copyright (C) 2015 The Qt Company Ltd.
4 ** Contact: http://www.qt.io/licensing/
5 **
6 ** This file is part of the documentation of the Qt Toolkit.
7 **
8 ** $QT_BEGIN_LICENSE:FDL$
9 ** Commercial License Usage
10 ** Licensees holding valid commercial Qt licenses may use this file in
11 ** accordance with the commercial license agreement provided with the
12 ** Software or, alternatively, in accordance with the terms contained in
13 ** a written agreement between you and The Qt Company. For licensing terms
14 ** and conditions see http://www.qt.io/terms-conditions. For further
15 ** information use the contact form at http://www.qt.io/contact-us.
16 **
17 ** GNU Free Documentation License Usage
18 ** Alternatively, this file may be used under the terms of the GNU Free
19 ** Documentation License version 1.3 as published by the Free Software
20 ** Foundation and appearing in the file included in the packaging of
21 ** this file.  Please review the following information to ensure
22 ** the GNU Free Documentation License version 1.3 requirements
23 ** will be met: http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html.
24 ** $QT_END_LICENSE$
25 **
26 ****************************************************************************/
27
28 /*!
29     \page unix-signals.html
30     \title Calling Qt Functions From Unix Signal Handlers
31     \brief You can't. But don't despair, there is a way...
32
33     \ingroup platform-specific
34     \ingroup best-practices
35
36     You \e can't call Qt functions from Unix signal handlers. The
37     standard POSIX rule applies: You can only call async-signal-safe
38     functions from signal handlers. See \l
39     {http://www.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/000095399/functions/xsh_chap02_04.html#tag_02_04_01}
40     {Signal Actions} for the complete list of functions you can call
41     from Unix signal handlers.
42
43     But don't despair, there is a way to use Unix signal handlers with
44     Qt. The strategy is to have your Unix signal handler do something
45     that will eventually cause a Qt signal to be emitted, and then you
46     simply return from your Unix signal handler. Back in your Qt
47     program, that Qt signal gets emitted and then received by your Qt
48     slot function, where you can safely do whatever Qt stuff you
49     weren't allowed to do in the Unix signal handler.
50
51     One simple way to make this happen is to declare a socket pair in
52     your class for each Unix signal you want to handle. The socket
53     pairs are declared as static data members. You also create a
54     QSocketNotifier to monitor the \e read end of each socket pair,
55     declare your Unix signal handlers to be static class methods, and
56     declare a slot function corresponding to each of your Unix signal
57     handlers. In this example, we intend to handle both the SIGHUP and
58     SIGTERM signals. Note: You should read the socketpair(2) and the
59     sigaction(2) man pages before plowing through the following code
60     snippets.
61     
62     \snippet doc/src/snippets/code/doc_src_unix-signal-handlers.cpp 0
63
64     In the MyDaemon constructor, use the socketpair(2) function to
65     initialize each file descriptor pair, and then create the
66     QSocketNotifier to monitor the \e read end of each pair. The
67     activated() signal of each QSocketNotifier is connected to the
68     appropriate slot function, which effectively converts the Unix
69     signal to the QSocketNotifier::activated() signal.
70
71     \snippet doc/src/snippets/code/doc_src_unix-signal-handlers.cpp 1
72
73     Somewhere else in your startup code, you install your Unix signal
74     handlers with sigaction(2).
75
76     \snippet doc/src/snippets/code/doc_src_unix-signal-handlers.cpp 2
77
78     In your Unix signal handlers, you write a byte to the \e write end
79     of a socket pair and return. This will cause the corresponding
80     QSocketNotifier to emit its activated() signal, which will in turn
81     cause the appropriate Qt slot function to run.
82
83     \snippet doc/src/snippets/code/doc_src_unix-signal-handlers.cpp 3
84
85     In the slot functions connected to the
86     QSocketNotifier::activated() signals, you \e read the byte. Now
87     you are safely back in Qt with your signal, and you can do all the
88     Qt stuff you weren'tr allowed to do in the Unix signal handler.
89
90     \snippet doc/src/snippets/code/doc_src_unix-signal-handlers.cpp 4
91 */