Update copyright headers
[qt:qt.git] / doc / src / examples / basiclayouts.qdoc
1 /****************************************************************************
2 **
3 ** Copyright (C) 2015 The Qt Company Ltd.
4 ** Contact: http://www.qt.io/licensing/
5 **
6 ** This file is part of the documentation of the Qt Toolkit.
7 **
8 ** $QT_BEGIN_LICENSE:FDL$
9 ** Commercial License Usage
10 ** Licensees holding valid commercial Qt licenses may use this file in
11 ** accordance with the commercial license agreement provided with the
12 ** Software or, alternatively, in accordance with the terms contained in
13 ** a written agreement between you and The Qt Company. For licensing terms
14 ** and conditions see http://www.qt.io/terms-conditions. For further
15 ** information use the contact form at http://www.qt.io/contact-us.
16 **
17 ** GNU Free Documentation License Usage
18 ** Alternatively, this file may be used under the terms of the GNU Free
19 ** Documentation License version 1.3 as published by the Free Software
20 ** Foundation and appearing in the file included in the packaging of
21 ** this file.  Please review the following information to ensure
22 ** the GNU Free Documentation License version 1.3 requirements
23 ** will be met: http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html.
24 ** $QT_END_LICENSE$
25 **
26 ****************************************************************************/
27
28 /*!
29     \example layouts/basiclayouts
30     \title Basic Layouts Example
31
32     \brief The Basic Layouts example shows how to use the standard layout
33     managers that are available in Qt: QBoxLayout, QGridLayout and
34     QFormLayout.
35
36     \image basiclayouts-example.png Screenshot of the Basic Layouts example
37
38     The QBoxLayout class lines up widgets horizontally or vertically.
39     QHBoxLayout and QVBoxLayout are convenience subclasses of QBoxLayout.
40     QGridLayout lays out widgets in cells by dividing the available space
41     into rows and columns. QFormLayout, on the other hand, lays out its
42     children in a two-column form with labels in the left column and
43     input fields in the right column.
44
45     \section1 Dialog Class Definition
46
47     \snippet examples/layouts/basiclayouts/dialog.h 0
48
49     The \c Dialog class inherits QDialog. It is a custom widget that
50     displays its child widgets using the geometry managers:
51     QHBoxLayout, QVBoxLayout, QGridLayout and QFormLayout.
52
53     We declare four private functions to simplify the class
54     constructor: The \c createMenu(), \c createHorizontalGroupBox(),
55     \c createGridGroupBox() and \c createFormGroupBox() functions create
56     several widgets that the example uses to demonstrate how the layout
57     affects their appearances.
58
59     \section1 Dialog Class Implementation
60
61     \snippet examples/layouts/basiclayouts/dialog.cpp 0
62
63     In the constructor, we first use the \c createMenu() function to
64     create and populate a menu bar and the \c createHorizontalGroupBox()
65     function to create a group box containing four buttons with a
66     horizontal layout. Next we use the \c createGridGroupBox() function
67     to create a group box containing several line edits and a small text
68     editor which are displayed in a grid layout. Finally, we use the
69     \c createFormGroupBox() function to create a group box with
70     three labels and three input fields: a line edit, a combo box and
71     a spin box.
72
73     \snippet examples/layouts/basiclayouts/dialog.cpp 1
74
75     We also create a big text editor and a dialog button box. The
76     QDialogButtonBox class is a widget that presents buttons in a
77     layout that is appropriate to the current widget style. The
78     preferred buttons can be specified as arguments to the
79     constructor, using the QDialogButtonBox::StandardButtons enum.
80
81     Note that we don't have to specify a parent for the widgets when
82     we create them. The reason is that all the widgets we create here
83     will be added to a layout, and when we add a widget to a layout,
84     it is automatically reparented to the widget the layout is
85     installed on.
86
87     \snippet examples/layouts/basiclayouts/dialog.cpp 2
88
89     The main layout is a QVBoxLayout object. QVBoxLayout is a
90     convenience class for a box layout with vertical orientation.
91
92     In general, the QBoxLayout class takes the space it gets (from its
93     parent layout or from the parent widget), divides it up into a
94     series of boxes, and makes each managed widget fill one box.  If
95     the QBoxLayout's orientation is Qt::Horizontal the boxes are
96     placed in a row. If the orientation is Qt::Vertical, the boxes are
97     placed in a column.  The corresponding convenience classes are
98     QHBoxLayout and QVBoxLayout, respectively.
99
100     \snippet examples/layouts/basiclayouts/dialog.cpp 3
101
102     When we call the QLayout::setMenuBar() function, the layout places
103     the provided menu bar at the top of the parent widget, and outside
104     the widget's \l {QWidget::contentsRect()}{content margins}. All
105     child widgets are placed below the bottom edge of the menu bar.
106
107     \snippet examples/layouts/basiclayouts/dialog.cpp 4
108
109     We use the QBoxLayout::addWidget() function to add the widgets to
110     the end of layout. Each widget will get at least its minimum size
111     and at most its maximum size. It is possible to specify a stretch
112     factor in the \l {QBoxLayout::addWidget()}{addWidget()} function,
113     and any excess space is shared according to these stretch
114     factors. If not specified, a widget's stretch factor is 0.
115
116     \snippet examples/layouts/basiclayouts/dialog.cpp 5
117
118     We install the main layout on the \c Dialog widget using the
119     QWidget::setLayout() function, and all of the layout's widgets are
120     automatically reparented to be children of the \c Dialog widget.
121
122     \snippet examples/layouts/basiclayouts/dialog.cpp 6
123
124     In the private \c createMenu() function we create a menu bar, and
125     add a pull-down \gui File menu containing an \gui Exit option.
126
127     \snippet examples/layouts/basiclayouts/dialog.cpp 7
128
129     When we create the horizontal group box, we use a QHBoxLayout as
130     the internal layout. We create the buttons we want to put in the
131     group box, add them to the layout and install the layout on the
132     group box.
133
134     \snippet examples/layouts/basiclayouts/dialog.cpp 8
135
136     In the \c createGridGroupBox() function we use a QGridLayout which
137     lays out widgets in a grid. It takes the space made available to
138     it (by its parent layout or by the parent widget), divides it up
139     into rows and columns, and puts each widget it manages into the
140     correct cell.
141
142     \snippet examples/layouts/basiclayouts/dialog.cpp 9
143
144     For each row in the grid we create a label and an associated line
145     edit, and add them to the layout. The QGridLayout::addWidget()
146     function differ from the corresponding function in QBoxLayout: It
147     needs the row and column specifying the grid cell to put the
148     widget in.
149
150     \snippet examples/layouts/basiclayouts/dialog.cpp 10
151
152     QGridLayout::addWidget() can in addition take arguments
153     specifying the number of rows and columns the cell will be
154     spanning. In this example, we create a small editor which spans
155     three rows and one column.
156
157     For both the QBoxLayout::addWidget() and QGridLayout::addWidget()
158     functions it is also possible to add a last argument specifying
159     the widget's alignment. By default it fills the whole cell. But we
160     could, for example, align a widget with the right edge by
161     specifying the alignment to be Qt::AlignRight.
162
163     \snippet examples/layouts/basiclayouts/dialog.cpp 11
164
165     Each column in a grid layout has a stretch factor. The stretch
166     factor is set using QGridLayout::setColumnStretch() and determines
167     how much of the available space the column will get over and above
168     its necessary minimum.
169
170     In this example, we set the stretch factors for columns 1 and 2.
171     The stretch factor is relative to the other columns in this grid;
172     columns with a higher stretch factor take more of the available
173     space. So column 2 in our grid layout will get more of the
174     available space than column 1, and column 0 will not grow at all
175     since its stretch factor is 0 (the default).
176
177     Columns and rows behave identically; there is an equivalent
178     stretch factor for rows, as well as a QGridLayout::setRowStretch()
179     function.
180
181     \snippet examples/layouts/basiclayouts/dialog.cpp 12
182
183     In the \c createFormGroupBox() function, we use a QFormLayout
184     to neatly arrange objects into two columns - name and field.
185     There are three QLabel objects for names with three
186     corresponding input widgets as fields: a QLineEdit, a QComboBox
187     and a QSpinBox. Unlike QBoxLayout::addWidget() and
188     QGridLayout::addWidget(), we use QFormLayout::addRow() to add widgets
189     to the layout.
190 */